Alaska Job Center

Well breakup hit the Kenai with a vengeance in the past week, with icy roads seemingly disappearing overnight and the rivers opening up to accept this year’s runs of salmon. All the salmon except those that go to support Peninsula fishing families that is - most of those wind up processed and shipped to markets nationwide. And it’s the jobs inside those seafood processing plants — very few are actually canneries any more — that we look at on this week’s Econ 91-9 feature.

Jay Barrett/KDLL

Hello, it’s March 30th, 2018, and I’m Jay Barrett with KDLL’s Econ 91-9.

The Alaska Job Service Center held its annual Job and Career Fair last week in the Soldotna Sports Complex. A score of job and military recruiters, trainers and more were on hand, as were hundreds of Central Peninsula folks looking for a job or a new career.

When it gets closer to fishing season, we’ll tell you what local canneries have to offer, but today, we focus on training.

Last week’s Job and Career Fair presented by the Alaska Job Center saw hundreds of Central Peninsula residents attending, hoping to find that perfect new job. There were also a score of presenters, that ranged from military recruiters to healthcare and from carpentry to seafood processing.

Gloria Rhodes was one of the recruiters attending the all-day event at the Soldotna Sports Complex. She works for the Kenaitze Indian Tribe, which has been on a steady growth curve in the past decade.

January and February are traditionally the top months for unemployment insurance claims on the Kenai Peninsula, which is understandable, with no commercial or sports fishing, construction or as many people in support jobs during that time of year. Which makes March a very good month for the Kenai Job Fair.

It will be on Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Soldotna Sports Complex, which is a change in venue from the past.