Jenny Neyman

General Manager

Jenny Neyman has been the general manager of KDLL since 2017. Before that she was a reporter and the Morning Edition host at KDLL.
She also worked in print journalism for 15 years, including 7.5 years as owner, publisher and editor of the Redoubt Reporter community newspaper in the central Kenai Peninsula.
She holds a bachelor's degree in journalism from Whitworth University in Spokane, WA, and grew up listening to KSTK public radio in Wrangell, AK.

Jenny Neyman/KDLL

July on the Kenai Peninsula means one thing to most people — fishing. Even if you don’t put a line in the water, it’s likely your friends, neighbors, co-workers or certainly the people in line ahead of you at the store do.

The Kenai National Wildlife Refuge Visitors Center has you covered this week.

“Fish week at the refuge is all about everything fish, so, not just fishing, but we started out on Tuesday talking about the anatomy of fish and what fish need to survive — so, habitat and what makes a healthy stream. Things like that,” said Leah Eskelin, park ranger with the visitors services department at the refuge.


Jenny Neyman/KDLL

The Kasilof River has been open to dip-netting since June 25. Newly expanded facilities and parking area on the north shore of the river mouth means easier access for dip-netters. Easier access means more visitors. And more people can mean more trash left behind.

That’s where the Stream Watch program comes in.

“If you’d like you can grab a bag and help yourself to cleaning up the roads or a little bit of the beach and the parking lot,” said Terese Schomogyi, a summer intern with the Kenai Watershed Forum’s Stream Watch program, which organizes volunteers to do restoration, protection and education programs along sensitive sections of waterways on the Kenai Peninsula.


Photo by Jenny Neyman

The July rush is in full swing, with residents and visitors trying to cram in as much summer activity as possible. But one aspect of Kenai Peninsula life has been quieter than usual this year — wildfire season.


In this month's Drinking in the Last Frontier, get a taste of the latest brew at St. Elias, made with locally grown hops. And hop on over to your 'third place,' perhaps to try this month's beer style, the gueuze.

Llama Llama is having a week! He learns patience for chores with Mama and how to handle bullies at school in "Llama Llama Mad at Mama" and "Llama Llama and the Bully Goat," by Anna Dewdney, ready by Charlotte Zumbuhl.

Wild plants sometimes get a bad rap. When they’re pretty, we call them wildflowers. But usually, when they’re in our gardens without being intentionally planted, they’re weeds. And if they’re especially tenacious, like horsetail, they might get called even worse names.

But how often do we look at them as food or medicine? Tia Holley, an ethnobotanist who works in the wellness program at the Dena’ina Wellness Center in Kenai, gives us tips on how and what to pick locally.

Lemonade Day

Jun 11, 2018
Jenny Neyman/KDLL

June 9 was Lemonade Day on the central Kenai Peninsula, with over 30 young entrepreneurs operating their very own business for the day. KDLL visited with several stands in Soldotna:

Interviews and Lemonade Day stand locations:

Paxton and Silas, Key Bank

Ryder and Gunner, First American Title

Samuel, Sportsman’s Warehouse

Tenakee and Ryan, Wilderness Way

Raylee and Micah, Napa

Christopher and Kaden, Odie's

Ava and Zoe, Binkley Street

Aiden, 4D Building

Justine, Elise and Alana, Beemun's

Jenny Neyman/KDLL

It continues to be a slow, cold, soggy start to spring this May, but the gardening scene is heating up.

The Central Peninsula Garden Club is holding workshops every Saturday this month, giving gardeners a chance to pick the brains of experts on a variety of topics. Last week, KDLL tagged along for some sweet insight into growing berries at Alaska Berries farm and gathered snippits of information on tree pruning with Curtis Stigall of An Arboristic View.

Host Jenny Neyman interviews noted Alaska mountaineer Dave Hart about getting started climbing 30+ years ago, staying safe and what he's learned along the way.

Tag along with Dave up Redoubt, Iliamna, Torbert and Truuli peaks during a live photo presentation at 7 p.m. May 10 at the Kenai Visitors and Cultural Center. Admission is $5, or free for KDLL members.

Welcome to Tune-In Tales, storytelling for kids on KDLL. Our first episode, May 3, is "The Three Mooses Mosely," by Sally Cassano, performed by Sally, Sara and Truuli Hondel, Austin Thomas and Mike Gallagher. Enjoy!

Jenny Neyman/KDLL

It's April — the snow is melting but not fast enough to be gardening outside anytime soon. But that doesn’t mean you can’t be harvesting. Greenhouses get you a jump on spring and hydroponics can be a vault toward productivity. Tour Cheryl and Steve Beesun's hydroponic greenhouse in Soldotna, with cucumbers, lettuce and zucchini already ready to eat.

Elaine Howell

In the March episode of Drinking on the Last Frontier, Bill visits Country Liquor for a look at the retail craft of stocking unique beers and ponders brewery secession planning to see who will pick up the tab for breweries in the next generation. Plus, the magic of yeast in brewing science, the return of beer gear and the kick of coffee beers. Cheers!

Jenny Neyman/KDLL

Spring is in the air, if not quite evident on the ground yet. We’re at least a month from digging in the dirt but if you’re planning to grow or raise your own food this year, now is the time to get started — and we’re here to help. On this month's Kenai Garden Talk, we’ve got the buzz on beginner beekeeping, some tips for your chicks and a plea for pest patrol. And if you're fresh out of patience waiting for farmer's market season, there's now a mobile option on the Kenai Peninsula, bringing produce to a parking lot near you.

CES and KPB

Central Emergency Services in Soldotna is hoping to be a little less centrally located by building a new Station 1 on a larger lot with more room to grow.


Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities

It’s been over 40 years in the making, and will likely be a couple more before construction actually begins, but the Cooper Landing highway bypass project moved a significant step forward this week.


Patch up your waders and fish out your fishing line, because king salmon season is right around the corner. But make sure you’re aware of regulation changes before heading to the Kenai River this year.


The Kenai Peninsula Borough School District is eying a $1.3 million to $2 million budget deficit next school year. Much of that will be covered by the district’s reserve account. But the rest, depending on how state and borough funding shake out, could mean cuts in the classroom.


alaskapublic.org

After five years of disappointment, the Alaska Cancer Action Network is hoping this is the year all workplaces in the state will be declared smoke-free.


Join Bill Howell on this month's Drinking on the Last Frontier for dispatches from Frozen River Fest, a conversation with Denali Brewing Co., thoughts on alcohol education and a flavor of brewing science — hops.

This week, on Econ 919, Kenai Peninsula Borough Mayor Charlie Pierce has been touting his plan to cover the borough’s $4 million-plus deficit this year with no new taxes. But a part of that plan means asking for administrative fees from the borough’s service areas. KDLL’s Shaylon Cochran has more.


Have you ever learned a lesson the hard way? Or maybe not learned one at all? You are not alone. True Tales, Told Live held a storytelling event Feb. 2 at Odie’s Deli in Soldotna on the theme “Lessons Not Learned.” We had tales from Glenn Tinker, Bonnie Bernard, Vickie Tinker, Kat Sorenson, Joe Spady, Elizabeth Earl, Sally Cassano, Joel Todd, Joy Petrie and Emily Knight, with Katilin Vadla and Jenny Neyman as the emcees.

Jenny Neyman/KDLL

The #MeToo movement started raising awareness of sexual assault and harassment through social media and leaped off the Internet with events, marches and gatherings in real life. On the central Kenai Peninsula, the Many Voices organization has taken up that banner with a gathering and panel discussion held last month. Susan Smalley, a community volunteer with Many Voices, and two panelists from the event, Dr. Kristin Mitchel and Dr.

Storytellers take a lighthearted look at darkness Dec. 8, 2017, at Odie's in Soldonta, telling true tales on the theme, "Lighten Up — Tales of Escape from the Dark." With hosts Jenny Neyman and Kaitlin Vadla and stories and poetry from Kerri Roe, Dave Atcheson, Jacki Michels, Merril Sikorski, Heddy Huss, Steve Schoonmaker and Meezie Hermansen.

Nine storytellers dish up true tales on the theme, "Family Recipes for Disaster" on Oct. 13, 2017, at Odie's in Soldotna.  Hosted by Kaitin Vadla, Jenny Neyman and Pegge Erkeneff, with stories by Zach Harden (brother), Megan Harden (sister), Sabrina Harden (mom), Paul Landen, Heddy Huss, Jacki Michels, Liz Earl, Kat Sorensen and Jenny Neyman.

Nine storytellers dish up true tales on the theme, "Family Recipes for Disaster" on Oct. 13, 2017, at Odie's in Soldotna.  Hosted by Kaitin Vadla, Jenny Neyman and Pegge Erkeneff, with stories by Zach Harden (brother), Megan Harden (sister), Sabrina Harden (mom), Paul Landen, Heddy Huss, Jacki Michels, Liz Earl, Kat Sorensen and Jenny Neyman.

(Due to technical difficulties, the beginning of Zach's story is missing. Sorry!)
 

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