Skilak Lake

Late Tuesday night the National Weather Service in Anchorage issued a special weather statement for high water levels expected on the Kenai River below Skilak Lake.

Water levels on the Kenai River are reported at bank-full just below Skilak Lake and at Kenai Keys, and they are expected to continue rising over the next few days, potentially peaking less than a foot over minor flood stage.

No widespread flooding is expected at this time, but low lying areas may have standing water ponding on them.

Redoubt Reporter

Two Soldotna men got a welcome, if unexpected lift home from the Alaska State Troopers Monday afternoon.

The two men, Donald Joachim and Benjamin Nabinger, had just finished a hike across the Harding Ice Field from Seward and found themselves stuck once arriving on the west side when they could not cross the Skilak River.

The Alaska State Troopers were notified that the men were stranded at about 1:24 p.m., and the pair were rescued by the AST's Helo 3 and delivered to the Soldotna Airport by 2:30 p.m.

National Weather Service

  The National Weather Service has upgraded its flood watch for the Upper Kenai River to a flood warning, meaning flooding is now expected at the Primrose Campground, in Cooper Landing, and Skilak Lake and Kenai Lake.

The flooding is driven largely by an outburst from a glacier-dammed lake into the Snow River near Seward. Heavy rains will add to the flooding, according to Eric Holloway of the River Forecast Center in Anchorage.

The National Weather Service has issued a flood watch for much of the Kenai River drainage due to the release of water from a dammed glacial lake.

The flood watch goes into effect Friday morning through Monday morning for Kenai Lake and the Upper Kenai River from Cooper Landing to Skilak (SKEE-lack) Lake. In addition, water levels on the Lower Kenai River, from Skilak Lake to Cook Inlet, are expected to rise to bank-full conditions as well.