ECON 919

Well breakup hit the Kenai with a vengeance in the past week, with icy roads seemingly disappearing overnight and the rivers opening up to accept this year’s runs of salmon. All the salmon except those that go to support Peninsula fishing families that is - most of those wind up processed and shipped to markets nationwide. And it’s the jobs inside those seafood processing plants — very few are actually canneries any more — that we look at on this week’s Econ 91-9 feature.

Econ 919

Apr 6, 2018

 

This week, the Pebble Mine and what it might mean for the Kenai.

 

 

 

 


Jay Barrett/KDLL

Hello, it’s March 30th, 2018, and I’m Jay Barrett with KDLL’s Econ 91-9.

The Alaska Job Service Center held its annual Job and Career Fair last week in the Soldotna Sports Complex. A score of job and military recruiters, trainers and more were on hand, as were hundreds of Central Peninsula folks looking for a job or a new career.

When it gets closer to fishing season, we’ll tell you what local canneries have to offer, but today, we focus on training.

  As politicians continue the war over who should and should not be entitled to health care in America, people continue to fall ill, many with little or inadequate insurance. Despite Obamacare, many still live without. On this week's Econ 91-9, Jay Barrett shares a profile of the Kenai Peninsula Community Health Services, which offers a wide range of services while it has grown exponentially and contributed millions of dollars to the economy over the years.

 

 

This week, what the alaska gasline development corporation needs from the city of Kenai for it’s much-hyped LNG project on the North road, but we start with job training.