Econ 919 — How the Kenai Peninsula Works

9:01 a.m. and 5:01 p.m. Fridays

Econ 919 is a weekly economic report for the Kenai Peninsula from the KDLL News Team.

Wells Fargo

Today, we hear how for-profit businesspeople, individually and through their companies, work not to earn a profit, but to better the life in our community.

Wednesday the Kenai Chamber of Commerce presented its annual awards during a luncheon ceremony. 

One of those people is AnnaLea Lott, the winner of the Chamber’s “Log Cabin” Award for just that, making this a better place to live.”

When cannabis first made inroads to social acceptability starting about 20 years ago, it was through medical marijuana. There was enough clinical and anecdotal evidence by that point that there were ingredients in cannabis that soothed anxiety in terminally ill patients, gave appetites back to cancer patients and was good for reducing inter-ocular pressure for what would become a small "epidemic" of "glaucoma." Now recreational cannabis, in the form of marijuana, is widely available, and on its coattails comes CBD, a cannabinoid in cannabis like THC.

Well, the Kasilof River is open to sport-fishing with actual photographic evidence of success in the Clarion. Soon commercial fishermen will be putting their nets in the water, and charter guides will be roaring up and down the Kenai at 6 a.m., followed by the thundering hordes of dipnetters in July.

 On this week's edition of Econ 919, we take a look at the effort to fund the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District, and as the budget season draws to a close, we find out what a fiscal year is and why we have them.

Nonprofit organizations permeate the Central Kenai Peninsula, doing such disparate public services as feeding the poor, protecting the vulnerable, attracting visitors and broadcasting unbiased news and information from around the state, nation and world. The one thing they all have in common is the need to raise money for their missions. On this week's Econ 919 we find out what professional fundraisers would like you to know about funding nonprofits.


 

A lot of planning goes into drawing visitors to the Kenai. This week, we dive into some of the challenges and opportunities for marketing the peninsula across the country.


Econ 919

Apr 6, 2018

 

This week, the Pebble Mine and what it might mean for the Kenai.

 

 

 

 


 

Everyone seems hopeful about the future both on the Kenai Peninsula and for the state as a whole. But simply being welcoming to new businesses or industries isn’t enough.

 

 


 

By and large, kids have little direct impact on the economy. Oh sure, Mom and Dad spend a lot on them, but with little disposable income of their own, school kids’ spending power is limited.

This week on Econ 919, Jay Barrett tells us how the people at Junior Achievement are training today’s kids to be tomorrow’s financially responsible and productive members of society.


This week, on Econ 919, Kenai Peninsula Borough Mayor Charlie Pierce has been touting his plan to cover the borough’s $4 million-plus deficit this year with no new taxes. But a part of that plan means asking for administrative fees from the borough’s service areas. KDLL’s Shaylon Cochran has more.


The city of Kenai is looking to grow its economic base. That begins with one of the city’s more abundant resources — land. Shaylon Cochran has more on the plans to catalog and encourage development around the city:


 

The state Legislature gavels in amid hopes that increasing oil prices and TAPS line throughput can help quell the state's budget mess, while Hilcorp has big plans for its stake in Cook Inlet.


In this first episode of Econ 919, we take you to the recent Economic Outlook Forum and introduce you to one of the newest players in the central Kenai Peninsula's economy. And we wrap up with some potentially encouraging news about your PFD.