Jay Barrett

Morning Edition host/news reporter

Born in Dillingham, Jay Barrett started in public radio at the age of 12, when the school district there started KDLG-AM. He has gone on to work in radio, television and print as a reporter, photographer and editor/news-director across rural Alaska. For the past dozen years, he’s been news director at KMXT Kodiak, where he’s produced The Alaska Fisheries Report for the last 10 years. He returns to KDLL 20 years from when he first came to the station.

Univ. of Alaska Fairbanks

On Thursday night, the University of Alaska College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences is hosting a forum in Kenai about salmon habitat protection policy. The panelists are representatives of state government and advocates from the industries most affected, such as sportfish guiding, oil and gas development and mining.

Milo Adkison is a professor of fisheries at the University of Alaska.

Alaska's largest charitable organization announced awards of $6.6 million Monday for a variety of projects around the state. Among the myriad projects funded, the Rasmuson Foundation directed $330,000 to Hope Community Resources for a project in Sterling. 

Those funds will be used to help complete what Hope is calling "an intentional neighborhood" on 20 acres just outside Sterling.

Facebook

Long-time Kenai Peninsula College psychology professor and local Democratic Party activist Marge Hays died Sunday. She was 84.

Word spread quickly online and among friends Sunday night that Hays had passed away.

Tributes and memories came in from around the country. One friend posted early Monday morning from Indiana, praising Hays for her positive, cheerful outlook, and credited her for helping him get hired as counselor, and later launching him on a “second career” in teaching.

John Williams

    Former City of Kenai and Kenai Peninsula Borough Mayor John Williams found himself in Washington DC this week on business for the Cook Inlet Regional Citizens Advisory Committee. He told KDLL's Jay Barrett that he got to meet with all three members of Alaska's congressional delegation, and was there when Congressman Don Young became the longest currently serving member of the House.

Earlier this week we introduced you to the local metalsmith and jeweler who is creating chain mail wardrobe for the Kenai Performers’ upcoming production of “Shrek The Musical.” Robin Lyons takes small c-shaped pieces of wire and intertwines them to create a surface that is designed to be resistant to arrows, sword blows and knife cuts - though for Shrek, very little of that is actually expected.

In the real world though, knife cuts aren’t that uncommon, especially during such common local activities as filleting salmon and halibut. Which gave Lyons an idea.

Wage growth in the Kenai Peninsula Borough outperformed the state average over the past 10 years. In figures released by the Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development, the state average went up 5 percent between 2006 and 2016, but grew 6 percent in the Kenai Peninsula Borough.

The average wage in Alaska was $50,790 in 2006, and rose, in inflation-adjusted dollars, to $53,160 last year, a gain of $2,370.

The average on the Kenai in 2006 was $44,200 and rose $2,708 in the succeeding decade to $46,908 today.

Jay Barrett/KDLL

Art can be found pretty much anywhere. Even behind the counter at the convenience store during a break. That’s where KDLL’s Jay Barrett found Robin Lyons working on a prop for the upcoming Kenai Performers presentation of “Shrek: The Musical.” Lyons will also be helping out as a stagehand behind the scenes, and will be on stage portraying a bishop in the cast. “Shrek: The Musical,” a production by the Kenai Performers, is in rehearsals now.

Gilmartin Family

Around Thanksgiving for the past 21 years, a Nikiski couple has ventured about as far away as you can go, at least culturally, to sell Christmas trees.

When Tom and Michele Gilmartin first drove from Nikiski to New York, it was just the two of them.

"Drove here with my wife in a Toyota pickup truck with a half-cap on it. And we slept in the back of that truck for 32 days and sold trees," Tom Gilmartin said. "Our first year I think we made, I don't know, $7,000 to $8,000 that year and we were tickled to do it, OK."

Alaska Earthquake Center

  A spate of earthquakes widely felt in Southcentral Alaska lately has some wondering if that's a good sign or a bad sign, insofar as larger quakes are concerned.

Checking with Natalia Ruppert, a seismologist with the Alaska Earthquake Center in Fairbanks, reveals you can't make assumptions on future quakes based on what we're feeling now.

A small earthquake on the Kenai Peninsula was felt as far away as Anchorage early this afternoon.

The Alaska Earthquake Center reported a 4.6 magnitude quake centered six miles northeast of Sterling at 12:17 p.m., at a depth of 23 miles. An even smaller, and unfelt 2.2 magnitude aftershock was recorded at 12:21 p.m. in roughly the same spot.

No damage or injuries were reported.

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