News

Fireworks fans and aficionados in Kenai will have to keep making the trip to the Matanuska-Susitna Valley for their New Year’s party favors.

 

The Kenai City Council decided against expanding access to fireworks at its meeting Wednesday. Perhaps not too surprisingly, several public safety officers testified against the proposed ordinance, which would have allowed for sales of fireworks within the city and eased restrictions on use.   

 

This week the Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly took its first look at the budget for next year. The real discussion will go on during public hearings in the coming weeks, but here are some basics.

 

At a bit more than $138 million dollars, the proposed budget for fiscal year 2018, represents approximately 3 percent growth over last year’s budget. As with every year, education takes the biggest piece of the pie, at roughly $54 million. Public safety is the second biggest spending area at $19 million, down a tick from last year.

Educators Rally Support for School Funding

May 4, 2017

Like every district across the state, the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District is facing another potential budget cut this year.

The Kenai Peninsula Education Association is asking for a status-quo budget, the same as last year. And even that will likely mean losing a few teachers.

The Senate majority in Juneau has proposed substantial cuts in an effort to help close the state’s $3 billion budget deficit, including $69 million in cuts to the state’s school districts and another $22 million in budget reductions for the state’s universities.

Courtesy of Jenny Neyman

Alaska is big. Emergency beacons and satellite communication devices shrink the time it takes for search and rescue crews to find you in an emergency situation.

Chris Hanna and Jenny Neyman, of Soldotna, know from snow-cave survival experience how important those devices can be, and Lt. Col. Scot Milani of the Alaska Rescue Coordination Center knows how they work. Join us to find out more.

New authors talk about writing, publishing and connecting with readers. Ninilchik's Mike Chihuly wrote about his life as a fire chief and fishing charter captain in "Alaska Fish and Fire." Kasilof's Joseph Robertia recently published "Life with Forty Dogs: Misadventures with Runts, Rejects, Retirees and Rescues," about the dog kennel he runs with his wife, and their successful mushing career with dogs other mushers didn't want.

Elaine Howell

Join Bill for what's new and noteworthy in beer news around the state (congratulations to Kassik's for their gold medals!), residues of prohibition, an explanation of the popular pilsner style and highlights of brew-related gadgets, including an at-home chilled growler (for those with some cool cash to spend).

Last April, Chris Hanna and Jenny Neyman, of Soldotna, went for an afternoon ski on the Harding Ice Field when a blizzard struck. After their tent was destroyed, they survived four hypothermic days buried in a hand-dug snow cave with little food, only body heat to melt water and constantly deepening snow above them.

Spoiler alert: They survived. Come hear how at 7 p.m. April 28 at the Kenai Visitors and Cultural Center. Excerpts of their talk will be posted here.

Yes, there's still snow on the ground but that doesn't mean gardeners can't get some dirt under their fingernails. Get your seeds started indoors, plan to grow your farming business and harvest tips from experienced gardeners at a season kickoff roundtable event.

Joseph Robertia

Kasilof residents Joseph and Colleen Robertia talked about taking their 3-year-old daughter and teenage foreign exchange student to explore the wilds of Cuba and Belize.

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